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November 2010

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

sissydudeomen2:

via Robert

From the scrapbook

theunarchive:

(Via eatsleepdraw.com, not my drawing!)

The Pink Mince mood board

feastingonroadkill

From the scrapbook

kupferschrift:

मेरा भारत महान by Meena Kadri

Hometown

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adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Staten Island Ferry, New York Harbor — April, 1959

From the scrapbook

numberoftheday:

Flying A Household Oil Can, 1950’s (by Roadsidepictures)

From the scrapbook

lcfi7tXFlQ1qd7ygh

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Home-Cote Quick Dry Enamel

Woody

kupferschrift:

Morgan Press Wood Type (Sat./SI/EN!) (via kindra)

From the scrapbook

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Sketches of Maine - Art Direction

from the Monkeyfist collection

My style

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I totally want these. No lie. Especially the jacket.

publiccollectors:

Scanned from a Summer 1969 Sears catalog. Usually I hold back on the judgment and editorializing about things I post on Public Collectors but these patriotic shopping list ensembles just can’t possibly be real. No one bought those right? I refuse to believe that men were walking around on the beach looking like fucking idiots wearing red, white and blue get ups blaring such catchy slogans of the 1960s as: “MILK”, “POTATO CHIPS”, “SHRIMP”, “PIZZA” and “CHEESE.” No way. This shit did not exist. Not a single purchase was made.

This season's colors

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Spring 2011 here I come!

publiccollectors:

For your Black Friday shopping mania, some selections from the 1969 Sears Summer catalog time machine. I’m guessing this incredible look never quite took off. More scans from this publication here.

The Pink Mince mood board

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hellformotors:

Knee Dragger

From the scrapbook

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numberoftheday:

allumettesmotochiffre029
[ via pillpat (agence eureka) ]

Ramesis

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donnalethal:

let rudy valentino predict it for you!

Grateful Grapefruit

Grateful Grapefruit: The “zine for horny nerds” (the other one besides Pink Mince, of course) gives us a little love. 

That's a bargain

mudwerks:

(via donnalethal)

The final frontier

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monkeypants:

United Kingdom Space Capsule UKI

Men in Spacesuits

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monkeypants:

Grissom, Glenn & Shepard

Doom!

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rraaaarrl:

CUE DRAMATIC AND PONDEROUS EXPOSITION ABOUT THE DAYS OF YORE

;~;

From the scrapbook

The Everyday Experiment

The Pink Mince astro-buddies, as featured in Andew Slatter’s journal The Everyday Experiment

Sina Evil speaks!

Check out this short but great interview with my beloved pal Sina Evil, whose illustrations were featured in Pink Mince #5 — The Louche, Limp-Wristed Lifestyle — and Pink Mini #2 — Boycrazyboy

The Pink Mince mood board

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The Pink Mince mood board

Superstore

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The Pink Mince mood board

We’re in excellent company over at It’s Nice That

Times Modern and the modern Times

Times_and_iPad.jpg

There's a tendency when talking about typefaces to focus on the little details. However, this is a story about the life cycle of typefaces, specifically the way typefaces have been a crucial part of the life cycle of The Times of London, a trusted brand that has carefully cultivated its use of typography for decades.

I recently gave a talk at the Click series of conferences in New York, San Francisco, and London, which were partly sponsored by my employer. My talk was about the history of custom type used by The Times of London, particularly the Times Modern family that they currently use for headlines and other display stuff in the paper and in their digital versions.

Someday there should be a video available of the version I delivered in San Francisco, but until that surfaces you can also get a more refined version of the story (including a bunch of photos I took of the The Times offices here in London) in the sleek new issue of Linotype's bilingual Fonts in Focus magazine, available now for just the price of postage.

Fonts in Focus

From the scrapbook

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mudwerks:

… if you can draw and smoke a pipe! (by James Vaughan)

Hipsta-Michi

Michi

It's a terrible shame that I won't actually be in London to see it, but I was delighted to find out that the photo above is going to be part of a show of Hipstamatic images at the Orange Dot Gallery in London in January.

Perhaps the folks putting together the exhibition had a simoiar reaction to my pal Norm, who once said of that photo: "It looks the way I want to feel." For me, I’ve always loved how that image captures captures the mood of a relaxed, uncomplicated summer day with friends — a rare instance of proper, perfect vacation — in a little Austrian village called Streifing.

From the scrapbook

retrogasm:

♥Sexist Sunday♥

FYI I wanted Hillary to be our first female president…

From the scrapbook

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The Stilla “Z” really IS kind of great, which is why I have a tattoo of it.

numberoftheday:

Back issues of U&lc have been made available for download from fonts.com. Page 15 from volume 1 number 2, first printed in 1974.

Designed by Herb Lubalin.

From the scrapbook

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wordsandeggs:

“The Tattooed Man” (1930), via Agence Eureka.

Dust-up

comicallyvintage

He died a hero

mudwerks:

… astro chimp (By x-ray delta one<)

From the scrapbook

lc48zzgVbR1qd7ygh

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Golden Barge, Thailand 1980

From the scrapbook

Yes.

knappy-head:

(via Super Underwear Perverts)

Sparky in exile

So, yeah, I’m leaving the UK for a bit. I’ve been here for the last four years on a series of visas, and my current work permit expires in a little under two weeks. We haven't been able to get the right paperwork for my next visa in time, so I’ve got to be out of the country before the stroke of midnight on the fateful day. Now my only option is to stay away until all the paperwork is sorted, and then reapply from within the United States.

It sucks, hugely. Although I’d already planned to travel for most of December anyway, suddenly I have to buy extra plane tickets, exploit the hospitality of friends for longer than I’d planned or wished to do, and scramble to fill that time with extra work when I’d been planning to take a break after the completion of my job. And instead of settling into the new year with a new job, new opportunities, and the return to solvency, I’ve got to head back to New York and float from couch to guest room to couch while I deal with bureaucracy, burn through what little money I have, and just hope things work out.

The sudden change in plans is one thing, but the uncertainty is the bit that’s doing me head in. It's likely, yes, but not certain that I'll be allowed back. The Home Office has been really difficult about my sponsorship so far — the main reason it's taken so much longer than anticipated — and I have to throw what I can fit into a suitcase and just hope the final details fall into place. If they find fault with any part of my application, than I could really be stuck an ocean away from the life I’ve been slowly building for myself for the last four years. Even if all goes well, I don't know how long it will take to come back and for things to settle down. This is already screwing upplans to travel and teach in January, and may even screw up another trip to India I was starting to plan. I’m rattled that the stability I’d been holding out for has been snatched away for a while more.

Even if things go well and I can get myself back to England by the end of January, there's another problem. This will probably throw off my plans to apply for permanent settlement, since the interruption in my visa status may invalidate the time I’ve spent here already, leaving me with another five years to go before I can stay without any trouble.

So that’s that. I'll be living out of suitcase for at least two months — hoping for the best, trying not to be a burden, working when and where I can, and waiting to see if things fall apart of fall into place come February or so. Wish me luck!

Fighting Trousers

Wonder Woman should know this already

comicallyvintage:

The Superior Person Holds Emotions In Check!

Life on Mars

For the record, in case any of you are or know eccentric billionaires, I would ABSOLUTELY be willing to go to Mars, regardless of whether or not there were a way to get back. In fact, that would be a certain part of the appeal. Surely the need for this fatalistic derring-do of mine is of vital importance toward future colonization, right? Surely a Mars mission needs an introspective (yet appropriately sociable) designer/zinester to document the journey and the inevitable decline of the first colony, right? How else would future generations learn? I already have a thing for space suits! SEND ME TO MARS, DAMNIT!

From the scrapbook

lukasvonincher:

(via herekitty)

Odorama

From the scrapbook

2headedsnake:

pour15minutesdamour.blogspot.com

From the scrapbook

jockohomo:

Stereo Stack - If only because I’m still a vinyl junkie, even though I don’t have room.

From the scrapbook

The Pink Mince mood board

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Carl Th. Dreyer at Work

From the scrapbook

comicallyvintage:

Spidey always tingles on his way to see the boys…

From the scrapbook

sailorjunkers:

Well, helloooooo sailor! (by eliz.avery)

From the scrapbook

From the scrapbook

I knew her when

Long before autotune, that Oscar, little baby Apple, and even her duet with Huey Lewis, young miss Gwyneth Paltrow and a few of her chums at the exclusive Spence School on the upper east side of Manhattan planned a small production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown as a senior class project. I, ladies and gentlemen, was cast as Charlie Brown in that production.

Spence was an all-girls school, so just like the all-boys school I attended nearby, they had to recruit from other schools in the area to round out the cast if they put on a show. (This is a big reason why it wasn't considered that faggy to get involved with the theater in single-sex schools: it was an effective way to meet suitors. That also made it good camouflage if you were just a typical teenage musical-theater fag.) After seeing a flyer for auditions at Spance appear in the locker room one day, my pal Neil and I went slightly further uptown and were soon cast as the male leads.

Sadly, the show never made it to the stage. After a few rehearsals held at Spence and in the sprawling 5th Avenue apartment where one of the girls lived, we stopped hearing anything from the girls. One of them had a little brother at our school, and he sheepishly asked us to return our scripts because the show was cancelled.

A lot of the details of this are all very fuzzy now: I can't remember what I sang at the audition, and even though I know Neil was going to be Snoopy, I’m not totally sure what part Gwyneth had. If I’d have known one of us would become famous I might have retained more. But it wasn't until many years later that I connected that chick who was in that movie with the teenager I knew a little who had an actress mother named Blythe Danner whose name only barely rang a bell. I recall Neil saying he wasn't that interested in her, since her classmate Gretchen — the one with the brother in our school — had much more impressive tits. I was convinced all along that I would never see these girls again, anyway, since they were obscenely wealthy and moved in different circles altogether. Spence was, after all, one of the inspirations for the school in Gossip Girl, and I was definitely just a working class art nerd.

Random bits of loosely related trivia that have occurred to me while writing this:

From the scrapbook

comicallyvintage:

Wonder Woman… you’re doing it wrong.

From the scrapbook

From the scrapbook

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

From the scrapbook

yourplantsaredead:

puurr, puurrr francine!

From the scrapbook

It Gets Better

Overall, I’m a big fan of the It Gets Better project. I think it's an incredibly important message to send out into the world, if only because there are so many kids who really, really need to hear it, and get a little strength and encouragement from it. The world isn't an easy place, and I know the truth really is that — as a wise friend of mine expains — it gets complicated. Overall, though, I’m for the effort, and regularly touched by the variety of ways I see the idea repeated, and the variety of people who have taken the time to repeat it. Tonight I found this one by Murray Hill and friends, and it was immediately my favorite:

What I love about this is that it's joyous. Not glib, not maudlin, not too specific — just filled with spirit and energy and good will. This is what would have really reached me when I was young: the site of that huge, happy, heterogenous, homosexual crowd all having fun in one place without it seeming weird or scary or dull or over-the-top. In fact, it captures the spirit of many, many nights I’ve spent out at shows or little clubs over the years, and it makes me happy to see it.

On the whole, I’m not a happy person. Believe it or not, I keep a tight lid on most of my moping and griping. The honest truth is that my baseline emotion is one of frustration and futility, peppered with a generous dose of poor self-confidence. You know what, though? The gay thing has never been the cause of that. Sure there were scattered moments of anxiety during the coming-out years, but never despair about that part of the equation. As the realization that I was gay crept up on me, I never thought I was wrong or bad because of it. It was just stressful to figure out how to change course.

I cling to the few and fleeting things in life that make me feel really happy, and the truth is that a lot of them connect to being gay, and I couldn't be more grateful for that. Whether it's been the love of interesting men, the comaraderie of friends, the link to a variety of subcultures that resonate with me, or even the increasingly outdated thrill of being a little outré, there's a lot about being gay that makes parts of my life good. There's been plenty of pain in life over the years, but the gayness — the sexual identity, the cultural identity, and the permission to figure out my own way in the absence of an established model to follow — has generally been the salve, not the sore.

I’ve been lucky in that I was able to stay below the radar (mostly) before coming out on my own terms, and then I found that no one loved me any less, or thought any worse of me. Because of that fortune, it's a little hard to really and truly understand what it's like for kid trying to figure all this out in worse circumstances. But you know what? That just makes me even more sure that every kid deserves the love and support that I realized was there all along. And they deserve to find themselves — if that’s what they want — in a roomful of energetic, interesting people not just telling them — but showing them — that it gets better.

From the scrapbook

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

From the scrapbook

matthewlyons:

vintage computing 1958 (via retro-space)

From the scrapbook

bipolaroide:

space oddity

The Pink Mince mood board

fullofwhoa:

Context is for the weak.

From the scrapbook

retrogasm:

A robot and his boy…

From the scrapbook

From the scrapbook

retrogasm

From the scrapbook

hedda-hopper:

Rosalind Russell and Jan Handzlik, Auntie Mame (1958)

The Pink Mince mood board

androphilia:

Wheeler, M.A.C. Football Player

The Pink Mince mood board

The Pink Mince mood board

zenlavie:

Diabolik

The Pink Mince mood board

From the scrapbook

The Pink Mince mood board

Making a big run to the Post Office today, in case anyone has been trying to decide when would be the perfect time to order an issue or two…

From the scrapbook

comicallyvintage:

You Fresh Things!

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